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Is anyone running higher than manufacturer recommended specs on ARP head studs?

For the 4B11T ARP says to go hand tight then use 3 incremental steps of 30 / 60 / 90 ft/lbs.

On the 4g63 people are running 100+ for high boost applications with great results. I was just wondering if anyone here has gone past 90 ft/lbs on their motor.
 

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Is anyone running higher than manufacturer recommended specs on ARP head studs?

For the 4B11T ARP says to go hand tight then use 3 incremental steps of 30 / 60 / 90 ft/lbs.

On the 4g63 people are running 100+ for high boost applications with great results. I was just wondering if anyone here has gone past 90 ft/lbs on their motor.

,30,60 , 90 sounds good I wouldn't go past that . All I've done in the including my own car were at 80lbs so 90 would be good for higher hp cars .
 

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If ARP specifies 90 Ft-Lbs WITH their lube, that's VERY tight for a 12mm stud.

The torque correction factor for engine oil versus their lube is 30%.
bringing an old thread up. Is that 30% more torque if using motor oil? Finding it a bitch to find just the lube locally and I need to take the nuts off.
 

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bringing an old thread up. Is that 30% more torque if using motor oil? Finding it a bitch to find just the lube locally and I need to take the nuts off.
It's completely detailed in their manual. Download it and read.

Briefly if you use 90 Ft-Lbs of twisting force with engine oil, you get "x" tightening/clamping force.

When using their lube and 90 Ft-Lbs of twisting force, you get 1.30x.

You can use almost any moly-based anti-seize and get the exact same results as using ARP's "special" lube.
 

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Is that 30% more torque if using motor oil? Finding it a bitch to find just the lube locally and I need to take the nuts off.
Torque, the twistring force that you can measure, translates into the amount of bolt/stud stretch - whcih defined the clamping load. If you lower friction to rotate the nut on the stud, the *clamping* load on the stud will be higher for the same twisting force.

Too much stretch of the stud will permanently deform it. ARP recommends to replace any fasteners that stretch more then 0.001" form their original length. Yes, this requires lots of record keeping. Tightening too much will damage the studs by stretching them beyond their plastic level.
 
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