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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just finishing up my SSP cooler install and about to put the undertray back on when I noticed a bolt fused to the oil change panel. It also had a second impression where another bolt had fallen out. Just checked, am missing at least two bolts from the top of my stock o2 housing. I have a cp-e downpipe, but like I said stock o2. Anyone else seen this? I suppose I should just get a replacement bolt from the hardware stock and bolt the bitch back up? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Goddam irritating.
 

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These happen all the time. It happened on my ets o2 eliminator down pipe...so locktite on the bolt should hold it...lucky for me my dp was cracked and ets sent me a new one for free...anyone one in the va area want to install it for me? pm me

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Thread locking coumpinds are good to a MAX temp of 600F. Ain;t gonna help much at 1500+.

Just get some grade 8 bolts with anti sieze and make sure they are tight.
Grade 8 (SAE) is rated to a max of 450F. And Metric 8.8 is to a max of 600F. One needs HIGH-TEMP materials for these applications - >1600F on STOCK engines.

The high-temp anti-seize is always a very good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I went to the hardware store and asked for the stoutest bolt they had (no auto parts stores I called carry grade 8) and I got a bolt that says 8.8 JH. Luckily the guy there had an Evo 8, so he at least generally know what I was trying to do. Will that suffice? I don't know much about bolt grades.
Wasn't going to use loctite, just anti-seize
I think its ironic that most people have trouble getting these things about, and mine are flying off faster than I can keep them in. I guess I should feel lucky that one melted itself into the plastic of the tray, or else I'd never know. Still weird
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Indeed. Let me know where I can get these, even online. I am mainly using bolt I got at the hardware store as a temporary solution. I'm getting my new rims and tires installed in the tomorrow morning and have about an hour trip. I can wait, but have quit a few track days coming up and want to get this think tightened down hopefully for good
 

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Proof Load Yield Strength Tensile Strength
(psi) Min (psi) Min (psi)
85,000 92,000 120,000
120,000 130,000 150,000
8.8 is on top grade 8 is on bottom they are close enough for your needs.
 

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A grade 8.8 metric bolt is equivalent to a grade 5 american bolt. Grade 10.9 metric is equivalent to a grade 5 american bolt. A grade 8.8 bolt is good enough.
http://www.k-tbolt.com/bolt_chart.html

Put your purse down and tighten that bolt. I would advise not to use thread locker but use anti seize on your bolts. You dont want to have to cut the bolt off the next time you go to take it off.
 

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Proof Load Yield Strength Tensile Strength
(psi) Min (psi) Min (psi)
85,000 92,000 120,000
120,000 130,000 150,000
8.8 is on top grade 8 is on bottom they are close enough for your needs.
Do a little more reading. Look specifically for what operating temp those PSI ratings are for. Hint: It's a max of 500F for SAE Grade 8 hardware. So if you use Metric 8.8 material, get lots of spare bolts. You will need them. But don't just take my word for it. Do a little reading:

http://www.fastenal.com/content/documents/FastenalTechnicalReferenceGuide.pdf

"The initial heat-treating process is relatively the same for all three products. The parts are heat treated until fully austenitized. The parts are then quenched and tempered in a liquid (oil). This final tempering temperature is what will dictate our final product. The following are the minimum tempering temperatures for each specification:
• ASTM A193 B7: 1150°F
• SAE J429 Grade 8: 800°F
• ASTM A574: 650°F
As can be seen by the results, a lower tempering temperature will produce a harder and higher tensile strength part for these alloy steels. However, the lower tempering temperatures will also mean lower service conditions, ductility, impact strength and possible fatigue life. For example a B7 has a high temperature limitation of approximately 750-800°F. The socket head cap screws and grade 8’s have a limitation of approximately 400-500°F."

Also note that those materials get extremely brittle when cycled through 1600 F to air cooling repeatedly. Which means they break easily.

My local Ace Hdwr store has a good stainless (304) metric selection. That's the MINIMUM kind of material to consider for 1600+F usage.
 

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I know its a grade 8 but whats the actual dimensions of the bolt. There is a.company in pa that makes bolts that can handle 1500 degrees farenheught called carpenter technology. Thinking about getting a quote if I can get dimension of bolt.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I know its a grade 8 but whats the actual dimensions of the bolt. There is a.company in pa that makes bolts that can handle 1500 degrees farenheught called carpenter technology. Thinking about getting a quote if I can get dimension of bolt.

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If its cheap, I'll be in....but I would have to imagine that these are available already, somewhere. Its not as though the conditions these bolts are being subjected to are unheard of.
 
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