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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, this is a MINI How-To because the instructions you get with your radium products are fantastic. Consider this more a what to be aware of then actual step by step instructions.

This "Mini How-To" covers how to install the FST-R tank and Radium Fuel Rail.

Parts Required
- Radium FST-R with your desired pump configuration
- Radium Evo X FST installation kit.
- Radium Evo X Fuel Rail with one of the following options:
~~~ If you plan to re-use the oem fuel feed line, order one of these two options:
~~~~~~ 1) The aftermarket configuration as well as the PTFE Hose 23.0-90S-90 and the 5/16 Quick Disconnect Fitting.
~~~~~~ 2) The OEM configuration as well as the Fuel Injector Pulsation Damper
~~~ Or if you plan to run your own fuel line to the fuel rail, then simply order the aftermarket configuration. It comes with -6AN and -8AN connectors for the fuel rail.
- 25' (I ordered 50' but had a ton extra) Mcmaster Carr part number 5384K52. This will be used to route the vacuum signal to the FST-R
- Radium Fuel Pressure Gauge
- 3M P/N: 08578 Adhesive Strip Calk (got mine off amazon).
- Optional But Recommended: M8x1.25x25mm bolt and washer+lock washer from hardware store before you start.
- Optional But Recommended: 2 3/8" diameter hose plugs.

Tools Required
- Metric Socket and Wrench set.
- Adjustable wrench (the connectors on the PTFE hoses are not metric. But you can use a 17mm wrench on some, the adjustable is good for the rest)
- Phillips and Flat head Screw Driver
- Drill or any sharp tool that can be used to cut a hole through rubber.
- Wire cutter/stripper
- Soldering Iron and solder
- Needle Nose Pliers
- Heat Gun
- Metal Sheers
- Gas disposal container
- Shop paper towels, shop rags
- Zip Ties
- Fire extinguisher (just to be prepared, you're playing with gasoline).
- WD40 or other lubrication
- and whatever else I'm forgetting

Recommended Number of People
- 1

Difficulty
- 5. It's not that difficult, but you are playing with the fuel system and soldering in weird/awkward positions.


- 1 solid day. Depending how fast you work. I took 2 days, but made like 5 trips to the hardware store and spent 3 hours fishing out stupid spacers from the engine bay.

Clear instructions with pictures
- Open your radium products and read the instructions. Seriously, they're awesome.

My HINTS/Suggestions to make life easier:

Fuel Rail Installation Suggestions:

1) Step 11 of the Fuel Rail Installation: DO NOT Drop the spacers down this hole in the engine bay:

Or you will hate yourself: http://www.evoxforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=220202
I recommend removing them and storing them someplace safe until you are installing the Radium fuel rail. Then, stuff a rag or paper towel in that hole to prevent a spacer from falling down it.

2) Here is the fuel rail with all the appropriate fittings/connectors on it and the stock fuel injectors mounted in it:

Obviously handle the injectors with care. Use WD40 to spray on the O-rings before trying to push the injectors into the fuel rail.
Attach the Fuel Pulsation damper on the left side, the -6AN fitting on the right, and the green adapter for the Fuel Pressure gauge as shown. Don't forget the o-rings as per the instructions.

3) Attach the quick disconnect fitting to the smaller of the 90 degree fittings end of the hose to route between the OEM Hard fuel line and the Radium Fuel Rail. Then push the quick disconnect onto the hard line pretty force-ably.

It has to insert until it's past the lip on the fuel rail. Then the bottom half of the quick disconnect will slip right over the oem hard fuel line and screw up into the fitting to secure it in place.

4) Route the Fuel Hose as shown. This is the only way to get it to fit, it has to snake right through that gap. Put a screw driver or something between the fuel hose and the bolt on the engine as you tighten the connector onto the fuel rail in order to leave a gap so it isn't rubbing.



Fuel Surge Tank Installation Suggestions:

1) Expect the oem fuel tank to be dirty when you pop the cover off:

Clean it before working on it. Spray some water on it and it washes right off. It's probably not a good idea to get dirt into your fuel lines.


2) Step 5 of the FST installation instructions: Mount the surge tank to the base as I have mine oriented, it's the best way to have maximum clearance with the back seat area. I needed the clearance to fit my beatrush rear bulkhead divider.


3) Before Step 6 of the FST installation instructions: Skip to Step 21 and do the following:
-- Extend the blue wire as detailed in Step 22.
-- Solder the red wire extension to one of the Fuse leads as detailed in Step 24. Use your heat gun to heat shrink the connection with the included heat shrink tube.
-- Solder the red lead from the FST harness to either of the red cables from the relay that IS NOT the center red conductor of the relay, Reference the wiring diagram in Step 22. Make sure to put the heat shrink over the conductor before soldering the connectors together. Then heat shrink it over the connection.
-- Secure the Relay and Fuse to the FST base as described in step 21. Absolutely do this step BEFORE you mount it in the car, it's a royal PITA to attach once it's mounted.

4) Step 7 of the FST installation instructions: Use the new M8x1.25x25mm bolt instead of re-using the OEM bolt. Trust me, the OEM bolt is not long enough to thread through the FST base, washer, and spacer.

5) What to do with the unused fuel return line: I had a spray bottle where the connector fit perfectly into the oem fuel return hose. Like this one:

I aimed the end of the hose at the engine bay side into an empty bottle, and then used the spray bottle to wash out the OEM fuel return line hose with distilled water. I then blew a lot of air through the hose to dry it up, and lastly plugged both ends with the 3/8 hose plug.
Here's a photo of the PTFE hoses all connected per the instructions to the OEM Fuel tank/pump (obviously it's only 3 hoses as this is for the FST-R setup):


6) I routed my vacuum line through the cab of the car in order to protect it. In order to get the vacuum hose into the cab, I followed the instructions for feeding a wire into the cab when mounting a boost controller found here:
http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-x-how-tos-installations/374707-evo-x-boost-gauge-install-no-splicing-no-firewall-drilling-pics-vid-clean-hell.html

I first ran the hose up under the radiator cover, down through the fender liner and into the cab. Then along the floor under the trim, and finally up into the trunk. It was a pretty direct route and hopefully minimized signal delays. I was very generous with zip-ties to prevent it from rubbing on things.

My vacuum hose is the blue hose in this picture. You can also see the mock up of the modifications to the fuel housing cover:


7) Here's the final setup of the FST-R. Follow the instructions to connect the electrical connections as detailed. I was laying upside down in the trunk soldering at one point, but if you followed my recommendations in "3)" it should hopefully minimize or negate the amount of crazy uncomfortable positions you have to get in to do the wiring.
Also, I used the oem rubber hose that ran to the OEM FPR to act as a junction between the McMaster Carr hard line and the nipples on both the FST-R and the intake manifold. Hint: Dip the rubber hose in near boiling water for a little while and it will be much easier to stretch and slide onto the nipples and the McMaster Carr tube.


8) Instead of removing the fuse to prevent the pump in the FST from coming on when trying to prime the FST, just disconnect the harness from the top of the tank, this is MUCH easier to access.
Also, if you have the fast key system, take the valet key out of the case and put the case someplace far away from the car. You can then use the valet key to turn the ignition to "on" and the car should not attempt to fire. So this makes filling the surge tank and then priming the fuel lines a lot easier easy.
Check for any leaks after priming the system and before starting the car.

That's all the hints I have, enjoy!
 

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Nice writeup!

Question, is there something like the beatrush plate for people who still have their rear seats and want to keep them?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The beatrush plate really is a for looks thing only. There is no fire rating or other certified protection that it provides.

I've had a few people ask me this, I don't think you could install the seatbacks with the beatrush, or it would require a lot of modification. And I'm not aware of just a plate of sorts to fit between the seatback and the trunk right there.

Sorry
 

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Yea, I'm definitely looking for something that's a firewall while being able to support rear seats.

Thanks anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I never found anything that would act as a firewall. I figured this is better then nothing as it mostly seals, but it's not going to meet any racing organizations requirements that require a firewall.
 

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yea that was my concern too.
there is an opening in the drivers side corner of the trunk right? based on the pictures i'm guessing the lines in the radium evo x kit aren't going to be long enough to reach however.

i guess i can buy a long length of ptfe hose and build my own reusing the hose ends.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I'm curious why you wouldn't run the fuel lines under the car? As you said, I can't imagine this passing tech and man that is dangerous.
Well, I didn't read anything in the rules for events I plant on participating in prohibiting that placement there, and even read specific allowances for the removal of the spare tire out of the trunk/hatch to make room for the placement of a fuel cell. So I didn't think it would be a problem passing tech as they seem ok with fuel cells in the trunk.

I'll find out though... I've also been wondering if I can't just wrap that beatrush plate with a fire blanket for added protection.

But what makes it so dangerous? There's lots of setups that put fuel cells in the trunk?

yea that was my concern too.
there is an opening in the drivers side corner of the trunk right? based on the pictures i'm guessing the lines in the radium evo x kit aren't going to be long enough to reach however.

i guess i can buy a long length of ptfe hose and build my own reusing the hose ends.
You could do that. Might have trouble taking the hose ends off the radium setup, they seem pretty damn well attached. But the lines in the kit are definitely not long enough to reach that opening. And wouldn't it still be in the trunk anyway if you are mounting it in that opening?
 

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But what makes it so dangerous? There's lots of setups that put fuel cells in the trunk?
the trunk is fine if it separated from the main cabin, a simple bulkhead between the trunk and cabin would suffice to serve as a fire break.

the concern is there is a fuel line inside the passenger cabin.

You could do that. Might have trouble taking the hose ends off the radium setup, they seem pretty damn well attached. But the lines in the kit are definitely not long enough to reach that opening. And wouldn't it still be in the trunk anyway if you are mounting it in that opening?
yea most likely i would have to cut the hose off if i went that route.

yea but the trunk is acceptable. the difference is simply the routing of the lines. i could pass the lines from the tank underneath the chassis and never enter the passenger compartment and fish the fuel lines into the trunk. again, would probably need a divider for it to be legit.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess I see. If there's gonna be a leak or anything it's not going to be the fuel line though, it's gonna be at one of the connectors and those are not in the passenger cabin.

I guess I could just fab up a piece of aluminum to bolt down over top of the lines running in the passenger compartment as a physical separation. But I peeled that pump cover off with my fingernails, that was the first time it's ever been taken off on my car. So how on earth could this really provide that much less protection?
 

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i don't think the idea is that it needs to protect you from an explosive force but the simple presence of that buffer means fuel doesn't spray into the cabin/on passengers and subsequently if it did catch on fire that buffer offers more time to get out of the car.
 

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also, i think the precaution here goes beyond a leak in the line or fittings. once you install and thoroughly inspect your setup, you really shouldn't develop an issue.

what you are planning for is worst case scenario which is a collision. anything can happen and if something were to breach/twist/splits/cut something to do with the fuel setup, that is a huge potential risk. the last thing you would want is less time in a situation following a wreck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
i don't think the idea is that it needs to protect you from an explosive force but the simple presence of that buffer means fuel doesn't spray into the cabin/on passengers and subsequently if it did catch on fire that buffer offers more time to get out of the car.
I do understand. Just my fear of a line failing is minuscule. Do I think the fittings and connections could fail? of course, but those are not in the passenger compartment.

If something happens where that line fails, then I guarantee that surge tank isn't in good condition. And I don't see the beatrush plate providing any protection, it's not like it's air tight.

But I'll have my rear seat bottom cushion installed anyway, thing weighs a whole of 2lbs. So that will at least prevent any fuel from spraying around in the cab. I wonder if I couldn't just wrap the lines with some sort of non absorbent fuel resistant fire blanket or something? I mean, if the beatrush is considered a divider, then a fire blanket around the lines has to be acceptable.
 
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But what makes it so dangerous? There's lots of setups that put fuel cells in the trunk?
Yes but the fuel lines run OUTSIDE of the car and then into the trunk/fuelcell through bulkheads.

it's the fuel lines inside the car that concern me. Those are points of failure. Imagine if you go off or have a collision and one of those start leaking for some reason (foreign object, stress, etc) and you are in the car with fuel spraying all over the place. Now imagine it spraying on you, and a fire starts....

That would not be so comfortable right? Things happen REALLY fast:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mgKOLt1qmE

This is how most fuel cells are plumbed.. this is all outside of the car and passenger compartment:



 

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Discussion Starter #16
I understand what you are saying. I'll have to look into it. Run the lines under the car and then punch through and up into the trunk on the other side of that bulkhead divider.

Would making some cover/divider just to put over the fuel lines be just as effective? Take some aluminum sheeting and bend it a bit and bolt it over the lines?
 

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I understand what you are saying. I'll have to look into it. Run the lines under the car and then punch through and up into the trunk on the other side of that bulkhead divider.

Would making some cover/divider just to put over the fuel lines be just as effective? Take some aluminum sheeting and bend it a bit and bolt it over the lines?
i will considering this but damn would i hate to put a hole in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
i will considering this but damn would i hate to put a hole in the car.
LOL, I would have been hesitant like 1 month ago to do this. Now that I've mutilated the car installing the roll bar I've stopped caring soo much lol.

I also emailed radium about the concern of fuel lines in the cabin, I'll let you know what their reply is.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Radium got back to me about the concern about running the lines in the passenger cab area:

The PTFE hoses are reinforced with stainless steel braid. Any potential leak points (hose ends) are outside of the cabin area. The FST mounting point and lines run in a central part of the chassis away from common points of impact.
I'm not that worried about it. Honestly if I'm going to worry about this I should worry about having a fuel tank in the trunk as any crash that messes the lines up is going to also mess that guy up and sh*ts not gonna be good no matter what. And racing/tracking has never been considered to be the safest sport I don't think... sure we do all we can, but everything is a compromise.
 

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got mine and started doing a bit of pre-install stuff and making some decisions. trying to decide where to locate my fuelab filter and cut the supply line and install some fittings.
then the biggie, if i want to try and run the hoses under the car which means cutting a hole in the trunk floor behind the windshield washer fluid reservoir.


as far as the kit, it is very nice for sure. mine is a bit different than pictured (no regulator on the surge tank), 4 hoses. the only thing i didn't like is one of the hoses has a 90* fitting off the surge tank while the rest have nice 180* fittings which suit the setup and hose routing much nicer. i may change this.
 
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