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Discussion Starter #1
so, I'm prior military and thinking about using my GI Bill for college...I really have no idea what to take but I was thinking of something I can use to kinda give me a foundation for learning about tuning. If I take Computer Science, Internet/web programming, or software development would that help me with understanding more about working with ecu programming and tuning?

here are the programs for the college I'm looking at:

Computer Science: http://www.ohlone.edu/org/currguides/current/docs/computerscience.pdf

Internet/Web Programming: http://www.ohlone.edu/org/currguides/current/docs/cs.pdf

Software Development: http://www.ohlone.edu/org/currguides/current/docs/cs.pdf

Thanks fellas!
 

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Computer Science will be a waste of your time. They just teach you the overall basics and it's very broad. You are better off doing something like Software Development that will teach you a lot more.
 

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I think tuning is more related to knowning how these cars work rather than computer science... I'm a computer science student right now and I don't think they're too related. Programming is really the guts of everything and coding. tuning deals with maps and understanding the data and all that but someone correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Computer Science will be a waste of your time. They just teach you the overall basics and it's very broad. You are better off doing something like Software Development that will teach you a lot more.
I agree with that as well which is why I'm studying computer information systems which gives you a big background in business and finance :p its more practical. Amazing job opportunities
 

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Web development, because that's where the things are going - easy money right there ;) You do learn programming as part of it too.
 

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There's nothing wrong with getting an education, but i encourage you to pursue something that will land you a career. Are you planning to become a professional tuner?

What are your interests besides tuning? Can you cross pollinate your career with your hobbies?

I guess I want to understand the basis for your reasoning to take college classes geared towards understanding tuning better.
 

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All those courses will help you to create softwares and edit softwares, but tuning is punching in right numbers in right spots and to actually understand what numbers you punch in and what does the punched in numbers do to the engine, should'nt you learn more about engines and their controls. I am not an expert but just giving my opinion.
 

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I think tuning is more related to knowning how these cars work rather than computer science... I'm a computer science student right now and I don't think they're too related. Programming is really the guts of everything and coding. tuning deals with maps and understanding the data and all that but someone correct me if I'm wrong.
:yeahthat::yeahthat:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
There's nothing wrong with getting an education, but i encourage you to pursue something that will land you a career. Are you planning to become a professional tuner?

What are your interests besides tuning? Can you cross pollinate your career with your hobbies?

I guess I want to understand the basis for your reasoning to take college classes geared towards understanding tuning better.
I'm actually just thinking of taking courses to earn a degree and take advantage of my military Gi Bill. As far as career, I'm an Air Traffic Controller (have been for the past 14 years), and work for the FAA so hopefully I have the career path down pretty well. I wanted to get a degree in Aviation to help me move up the management ladder but there's none offered in my area as far as part time and online classes goes. That's why I figured I might as well use what I can get towards something that would possibly help me with what I love (cars) and learn something else on the side (earn a degree).

I wasn't sure which college programs would help me learn more about understanding ecu tuning, so i figured i would ask the experts here :)

looks like I should lean more towards software development or web programming?
 

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Best advice I can give after several major switches, 2 degrees (one associate one BA) , and currently pursuing a masters.

Don't confuse something you like to do, with something you would like to for a living. Also, don't go to school for anything you are already good at.

I enjoy cars, and working on computers. I went for mechanical engineering with a concentration in motorsport technology and quickly switched when I realized I did not care to know the stuff, and was bad at chemistry.

I was a computer science major for a while and had instructors inform me many a time that while my assignments worked as they were coded, that was not how they wanted it done. So I had to unlearn the way I knew how to do things, to do things their way, and it became more hassle then it is worth.

Furthermore, in IT, computer science degrees do nothing. They may get you an interview, or an internship for a job, but you can just as easily get a degree in sociology or anything else useless and then tack on an IT certification or to with self study and boom, your foot is in the door.
 

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You cannot just take whatever classes you want when using your GI Bill. You have to decide on a degree plan and the GI Bill will only cover the classes in that degree plan.

So my advice, find a degree plan first.

I also agree with thebatman. I have my Associates and I'm 11 classes away from my BA. After that I will be going for my MBA. When it comes to a degree, try not to limit your career field and don't get a degree that does not open you up to a variety of job opportunities. A degree should be a return of investment.
 

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If there is such a course, Mechatronics may be of interest. We had that undergrad degree in the college I studied at. Deals with embedded systems, their electrical design and programming and how they work in conjunction with Mechanical designs. Also, the future of automotive is all electric and hydrogen and hybrids. However, it would be worth noting that if you intend to make a living out of this skill you acquire, you'd have to expand your horizon beyond just "tuning", although it will help you with your hobby as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I really don't intend to make a living out of it..but want it as my Plan B or something to fall back on later in my life. Like I said, I work as an Air Traffic Controller, I already have a career...I wanted to get a degree in Aviation but there were none available in my area, plus I kinda feel like it would be worthless of a degree. I wanted to learn and understand more about tuning, and I love cars, and work on my own car as a hobby (have been ever since I got my first one) This is why I figured I would take a college program that would gear me towards better understanding computer programming and what not...I figured it would help me get a better base and understanding of the tuning side, and I'll earn a degree on something that would possibly be useful sometime down the road just in case anything happens with my current career...so I get to kill 2 birds with one stone :) maybe even get good at tuning and make it as a living (probably not lol!)
 

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As a general rule, you want your fallback option to be somewhat related to your main occupation. That way, if/when you return, your experience in either field does not go to waste. Having said that, I don't know the natural progression for an ATC professional.

The reason I suggested Mechatronics is that it trains your mechanical, electrical and programming aptitudes in a single degree. So if you ever wanted to move to an Electrical only, mechanical only or programming only fields, your learning curve is immensely reduced. However, I would take anybody's suggestion on here, including mine, with a grain of salt. Sounds like what you really need is a good Education Councillor.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
As a general rule, you want your fallback option to be somewhat related to your main occupation. That way, if/when you return, your experience in either field does not go to waste. Having said that, I don't know the natural progression for an ATC professional.

The reason I suggested Mechatronics is that it trains your mechanical, electrical and programming aptitudes in a single degree. So if you ever wanted to move to an Electrical only, mechanical only or programming only fields, your learning curve is immensely reduced. However, I would take anybody's suggestion on here, including mine, with a grain of salt. Sounds like what you really need is a good Education Councillor.
sounds good! thanks man :thumbup:
 

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No need for a 4-yr degree to become a "tuner". You'd be better off taking the EFI 101 and Advanced classes at EFI University and gaining shop experience somewhere starting out as a tuning apprentice and working your way up alongside an experienced tuner.

Here's the link for EFI University:
http://www.efi101.com

I'd also suggest reading the following books, in this order:
"Maximum Boost" by Corky Bell
"Forced Induction Performance Tuning" by A. Bell
"Dyno Testing and Tuning" by Bettes/Hancock
"Engine Management: Advanced Tuning" by Greg Banish
 

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To the OP,

I'm still enlisted and I'm finishing up my BA in CS this year. Honestly, I dont think any of the classes would help you with understanding tuning. Majority of my coursework was dealing with programming and understanding code. I'm not sure if CS is a worthless degree or not, but I hope its not. I've been job hunting and most of the programming jobs or network engineer jobs require you to have a BA CS degree or a BA in Computer Software Engineering.
 

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I went to college, too, and I know what it's like to be a student taking additional courses. Also, I would like to point out the fact that any courses develop you as a person. You don't have to skip them; that way you give yourself a chance to develop fully. Choose computer science, because it is our future. It is a topic that will be relevant for years to come, so you should think about it. Why not? It's as relevant as nursing jobs and courses from https://www.cnaclasses101.com/cost/ . I think you should choose between these two areas
 
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