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Most manufacturers will provide plastic hubcentric rings or what they call "polycarbonate".... cheap and works somewhat.

For daily use and short auto-x where you don't really heat up the brakes much, the plastic rings might hold up for a while.
Imagine what happens to plastic after they get hot, they get soft and flex, which is the opposite of what the rings are supposed to do.
I have DBA5000 2 piece rotors up front, and after a good day at the track, the plastic ones were no good.
when I got home to change out the wheels, the plastic rings were permanently stuck. Had to break them off with pliers and chisel.
They were so deformed that it was difficult to pull the wheel off.

We decided to make ours out of aluminum for obvious reasons.
doesn't corrode, doesn't flex or melt, and light weight.
 

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I say forget about the rings.. Especialy if you get ARP studs and a good set of lugs. Permatex Anti Seize a couple times a year works wonders. Most wheels for our car are lug centric. I got new aluminium rings with my RPf1's used them once= pita and they stay in the tool bag. Torqe Wrench = Happy Healthy Studs and Lugs.
 

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have both. I'll make it a habit of using the torque wrench on the lugs.

anyone have any advice for the rings? i see some places make aluminum ones. our hubs are 67.1mm, and the nt03+m has an odd-sized 72.6mm bore. makes finding a spacer a bit difficult :(
My winter wheels came with aluminum rings from Tirerack. I'm sure they are way more durable than plastic ones. However, they are machined to such tight tolerance that I had to use a sharp chisel to work under them so I could pop them off. This doesn't damage them as long as you're careful.

Someone mentioned lubing the lugs with lithium grease. Can anyone confirm that this is appropriate? I've only used anti-sieze lubricant.
 

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I say forget about the rings.. Especialy if you get ARP studs and a good set of lugs. Permatex Anti Seize a couple times a year works wonders. Most wheels for our car are lug centric. I got new aluminium rings with my RPf1's used them once= pita and they stay in the tool bag. Torqe Wrench = Happy Healthy Studs and Lugs.
No, irrelevant if the wheels and nuts are tapered it's not a good idea to say things like 'lug centric' as it's incorrect. People will read your post and think it's okay when that's bad advice.

The reason most wheels are 73mm instead of 67mm is because the wheels are made for other cars, bigger volume selling cars compared to Evo's. If the wheels were made specifically for the Evo then they would be 67mm, it's just that simple.

As for loading on your hubs and knuckles, if you don't use a hub ring for the wrong size wheels and rely on the tapered wheel nuts and wheels to do the work the hub was designed to do you'll be replacing your hub bearings prematurely. Just so you know, you cannot just buy bearings from Mitsubishi, they are a non-servicable item as far as Mitsubishi are concerned (bastards) so you'll be buying a new Hub Assembly when you flog out the bearings. Doing autocross (any form or motorsport where loads will be greater) will speed up this process. And the most awesome news of all is that the hubs from Mitsubishi are as dear as poison!

It's the hub that was designed to take high loads, not studs irrelevant if you are using stronger wheels studs, they arent designed for taking that type of loading from a geometry point of veiw. ARP wheel studs and others out there just like are designed to assist and help with race cars with the loadings they see with hitting things like ripple strips etc, it's impacts and heat which weaken the standard studs so ARP wheel studs exist. For what it's worth when you go to a different caliper with dog bones, different rotors and hats allowing for a thicker rotor you'll need longer wheel studs with longer wheel nuts with more purchase on the stud in a motorsport application, and even then you'd still run hubcentric rings if you have incorrect sized wheels, which the majority of people have. (including me)

We run stainless steel hub rings in our wheels, most of which are RAYS and it's frustrating to have to go to that trouble, but that's thing, you do need to go to that trouble. If I didnt need to, I wouldnt do it. No point being Robinson Carousoe on this topic.

As for lubing hub rings, yes you can do that. We use a high temp grease in our application as the tolerance of the rings can be pretty damn snug with some wheels.
 

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When you think about it, 5 x 1/2 UNF bolts @ 90lbft of torque are going to see in the region of 30 tons of clamping pressure, assuming a rough figure of 0.3 for the static friction coeff. - it could be much higher but I'm assuming the surfaces could be dirty/greasy - then it'd still take 9 tons of force between the hub and the wheel to move it, more if you have 5 or more bolt clamping systems. Now if you don't have a quality wheel you might get some vibration, I don't..The rings will stay in my bag, Thanks.
 

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Stop it... Hub centric is for centering only..No load . I'm done here. I like your shop though !!
 

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Hence the name hubcentric maybe?

So how do you think tapered wheel nuts and and wheel seats are going to 100% correctly centre a wheel, because they dont. Again, this is what the hub is for. Clamping load aside, you can have all the clamping force in the world but if the wheel isn't sitting true and centre it'll be as if it's unbalanced. Vibration much?

The idea of the hub ring is correctly displace the load over the bearings within the hub, the ring will do this better than tapered wheel nuts will. It'll stay balanced and share load nicely across the bearings ( you know, the ones you cant buy from Mitsubishi) when you have your nuts torqued up then rings have done their job.
 

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If I was a poser and only bought the wheels for show, the stupid rings would be on there. Changing them at every event is a pita... Convinced you don't need them, Sorry. I hope you use them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
hey there? can someone advice me? Evo 9 and 10 using same type of ARP stud?
Yes, they'll work but the APR studs are about 2x as long as the OEM studs. OEM is 45mm, APR is 76mm. You'll need open ended lugs. If your lugs are capped, they wont fit. This means you wont be able to mount the OEM wheels using the OEM lugs, and I'm not aware of any open lugs that are 100% compatible with the OEM wheels. It's an odd seat angle. Anyone know of any?

I noticed Moser makes some studs that match the OEM size perfectly, but I doubt they're as good as the APRs. On the other hand,they're cheap. Here's the details: http://www.moserengineering.com/oth...-1-3-4-quick-start-end-565-knurl-lincoln.html
 

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If I was a poser and only bought the wheels for show, the stupid rings would be on there. Changing them at every event is a pita... Convinced you don't need them, Sorry. I hope you use them.
Pretty convinced we don't fit into the poser category. ;)

We do use the. Fabricated up our own in stainless rings and they push fit into the wheel snugly, on the face leading to the hub they have a slight beveled egde to feed and capture the hub as they go on, that we don't have to worry about dramas when putting the wheels on with the gun. Steel long reach open ended wheel nuts, stronger extended wheel studs, it's a beautiful thing, 2 events every month for the last two years and still and easy process. We do have a set of hub rings in every set of wheels we have though, kinda does help having a racing budget.

For the kiddies living in road car land, the plastic rings would be good for snow and no track work. The alloy rings would be good for dry weather and track work but you do need to coat them in a grease otherwise they swell and corrode and become bastards to come off, also the alloy ones are softer than the wheels they are on so over time they get banged up pretty bad when you remove and replace them from wheel set to wheel set.

Stainless is pretty much the better solution out of the lot, then again I'm sure somewhere in the world you could buy titanium hub rings. Failing that you could just buy your wheels in the right size for an Evo (are you listening RAYS?) if they made them.
 
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