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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We have all these threads on engine tuning, but I thought we need one for suspension tuning for the track junkies.

Kevin (Exyia) and I were chatting on fb about our single adjustable JRZ RS1's.

So I asked him, wouldnt less rebound stiffness be better for the track since it forces the wheel back to the pavement faster right?

He replied, right, but it could also rebound the wheel too quickly, giving away the load on the tire you would need/want. For instance, you brake before turn-in. you brake to load the front tires and increase grip in the front. Too much rebound can cause the car to rebound too quickly and when I say too much rebound, that means too much rebound force, which means a slower rebound speed - see why it confuses the shit out of me? I 100% think it should be referred to as the other way around - but you get my point.

Then I said, ahhhh, thats why they have high speed rebound and low speed rebound adjustment, I was only thinking of high speed (going over bumps) so basically with our single adjustables, we have to find the sweet spot for both high and low speed also, rebound is the force of the coilover pushing the wheel back down, and the stiffer the rebound, the slower the coilover pushes the wheel back down, right?

I thought this was great info that needs to be shared and continued to talk about.

If you have a question about your suspension, feel free to post.

Info from other threads:

So I've been getting a lot of comments lately "...but I don't autox/track, just DD". This is starting to annoy me, because my original intention of my build last year was to build a strong daily - proving it's capability by autox, not build a strong autox car (though this year, that's what it's leaned towards). I chose autox because it's sport where lots of learned lessons can be applied to all cars, even dailies. It's cheap, accessible, and applicable to all owners.

This is a discussion. Feel free to discuss in this thread. Nothing I say is intended as fact - it is simply my finding throughout my two (ongoing) build threads.

Obviously this is suspension/handling related. Maybe I'll create a power related one later, but I don't feel there's enough content to discuss in that regard.

---Alignment---
DO NOT EVEN BOTHER THINKING OF ANYTHING ELSE BEFORE AN ALIGNMENT

DO NOT EVEN BOTHER THINKING OF ANYTHING ELSE BEFORE AN ALIGNMENT

DO NOT EVEN BOTHER THINKING OF ANYTHING ELSE BEFORE AN ALIGNMENT

This seriously drives me nuts. I would even go as far to say alignment is > tire choice. If you can't immediately recall your alignment specs, then don't even think about opening your wallet on handling mods yet.

My recommended alignment settings for stock-ish setups:
Front Camber: -2.0+
Front Toe: 0.00
Caster: This isn't adjustable stock, so ~4.1
Rear Camber: -1.5 to -2.0
Rear Toe: 0.00

The Evo X is a HEAVY car. It is a nose-heavy car. If your car is stock, on springs, or lower-end coils, you probably don't have a very high spring rate. The OEM spring rate of ~3.7k is laughably soft. You will always fight front end tire contact with this car, so more is always better - but I ALWAYS recommend at least -2.0.

The increased tire wear from -2.0 is very neglible - don't let anyone scare you out of it. The car starts to come alive at -2.0 or more (stock is only -1.0).

Many people think -1.5 is enough for rear camber. I disagree based on my findings/experiences. I started with -1.5, but got much even wear and temperature readings with -2.0. Always keep in mind that the Evo X is heavy and has very soft spring rates. It will always roll. If you are 100% street, then I would say -1.5 minimum. Sway bar factors in too (will cover later).

Note - for Rear Camber, I do not like to go further than -1.5 on just the adjustment bolt because of how weak they are. I prefer getting the rest from an adjustable Lower Control Arm, hence why Kozmic Motorsports thought it would be good to make a more affordable option on something we found was beneficial to have on ALL cars, not just race cars.

Toe; I dislike ANY amount of toe. Toe scrub will wear tires faster than any other factor, and I feel there are so many other ways to adjust handling/balance than using Toe In/Out, especially with the Evo X and our wonderful AYC. Many seem to agree with me on this, but some mess with toe on the rear.

If using a more aggressive setup (full coilovers/camber plates/stiffer spring rates):

Front Camber: as much as possible. I'm at -2.4 now and the tire wear is still pretty even. the tire as a whole will be worn out before I probably see uneven wear. I wouldn't go above -2.75 for a street car, but you probably won't hit that without a few tricks, so I simply say "as much as possible".

Caster: More is better. This is one of the huge appeals of the Vorshlaq Camber Plates to me. The extra camber is nice and all, but I got an extra 2 degrees of caster from them. 100% worth it.

Rear Camber: on 12k/12k springs and WL sway bars on soft, I found ~ -2.0 rear camber to be the PERFECT amount. My rear tires have a 100% even wear and relatively even temperature reading across. I don't see a need for any more than -2.0, even on the most aggressive setups.

Toe: I still don't like using Toe to alter balance/handling. There are so many other ways to do it imo.

---

Well that kept me occupied through lunch, I'll expand on other topics later. Feel free to discuss alignment, I'll do tires next.

For more details on how I came to my findings, feel free to check my build threads (both 2012 and 2013) below in my sig. And of course, props to the support that got me this far. They all helped me understand and build this information in some way.
Kozmic Motorsports
Forced Induction Development
GTWorx / Race Comp Engineering
Whiteline Flatout
 

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Great thread and idea. I recently put installed my auto fortune 510s. I am waiting to get an alignment before I adjust, but I have been on google looking for specs, or ideas on how to tune them. From what I found is adjusting the preload (which I did prior to installing them and they were all good) and for the stiffness, maybe thats the rebound I am not sure as I am retarded when it comes to suspension but they said to set them all the way on high, and go 5 clicks when adjusting from there. Looking forward to seeing what people post!
 

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If I were you, I would stop using the term stiffness. I like to think in terms of valve width. When I turn the knob in the "-" direction, I am widening the valve, allowing more fluid to pass through it. "+" is obviously the opposite. My input is going to be from the perspective of a double adjustable coilover since that is what I have.

Generally speaking, the coilover setup depends on the application. Obviously for street, you want something that compresses and rebounds with moderate valve settings relative to the spring rates.

For AutoX, I would want a suspension that is faster in assisting direction change. So compression valving is going to be on "high" to allow for quicker steering response while rebound is going to be "semi-low" allowing a somewhat faster rebound than street.

For the track, I have found "high" for compression and "semi-high" for rebound to be good for my setup. It allows for a slow compression around turns and a not so violent rebound.

Again this is all based on my 11K/13K setup on my AST 5200 inverted setup with R comps. There are so many variables, its just hard to draw a hard and fast rule about what works for any one given operating environment.
 

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If I were you, I would stop using the term stiffness. I like to think in terms of valve width. When I turn the knob in the "-" direction, I am widening the valve, allowing more fluid to pass through it. "+" is obviously the opposite. My input is going to be from the perspective of a double adjustable coilover since that is what I have.

Generally speaking, the coilover setup depends on the application. Obviously for street, you want something that compresses and rebounds with moderate valve settings relative to the spring rates.

For AutoX, I would want a suspension that is faster in assisting direction change. So compression valving is going to be on "high" to allow for quicker steering response while rebound is going to be "semi-low" allowing a somewhat faster rebound than street.

For the track, I have found "high" for compression and "semi-high" for rebound to be good for my setup. It allows for a slow compression around turns and a not so violent rebound.

Again this is all based on my 11K/13K setup on my AST 5200 inverted setup with R comps. There are so many variables, its just hard to draw a hard and fast rule about what works for any one given operating environment.

Ok sorry I will stop calling it that..lol So then when I do auto x I will do a stiffer set up. I will have to experiment with it. Thanks for your input!
 

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good thread idea. It is surprising how little suspension tuning/setup information is on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
good thread idea. It is surprising how little suspension tuning/setup information is on this forum.
exactly!

Added info from other threads:

Part 3 - Swaybars

This area of the suspension took me a while to open my eyes and understand. Thanks a ton to Andrew (again :)) on guiding me through it.

First...
Swaybars/settings are NOT black and white!

Everytime I read someone say
"oh, stiffer front will add understeer; stiffer rear will add oversteer"
I want to throw a Playstation4 at them.

This isn't Gran Turismo. Please quit throwing misleading information out just because you do it in a video game.

I don't feel like going into an explanation of what swaybars are and how they work. I feel like many already have an idea. I want to bring up what people mis-understand about sway bars here.

Upgraded sway bars simply reduce body roll. The sway bar connects two ends of the car. Body roll occurs when one side goes down, and one side goes up. Since the sway bar is physically holding the two ends of the car, the car MUST twist this bar to roll. Upgrading sway bars is done to demand a higher force from the car in order to twist said bar.

Our heavy cars on a macpherson strut system means body roll causes positive camber gain on the front tires. Obviously, we're losing contact patch and losing grip. A stiffer front bar would reduce body roll up here and combat the positive camber gain.



"But Exyia, everyone tells me a front bar would increase understeer and to just get a rear bar and be done"
A sway bar increases the speed/load it transfers to the tire/wheel. Since the body is rolling less, that force is being absorbed and loaded directly on the suspension instead. So yes, you will understeer more - because the tire will reach it's load capacity sooner.

But for most people, especially daily driven cars, you won't reach that (although I guess if you didn't pay attention to Part 2 and got weak tires it would). You WILL feel the reduced body roll in the form of obvious driver confidence, and more importantly, less positive camber gain. Remember, we are driving heavy cars - any understanding we know of suspension, apply 120%. The Evo X has the terrible traits of having spring rates WAY too soft (because rallycar!) and heavy weight up front. Combine the two and positive camber gain is probably the #1 thing combating your grip level. This is the reason that I recommend the front sway bar to everyone.

Yes, I know the install sucks. But don't let that tell you it's not worth upgrading.

As for the rear, this is another topic I can't agree with many on. I think the Evo X works worst with the rear sway on fully stiff. I won't go as far as to say it should be on fully soft - as that can depend on your individual setup - but I highly disagree with stiff rear ends.

A rear end too stiff (like having your rear sway bar at the full stiff setting) easily causes tail-sliding behavior - especially if you didn't upgrade your front bar. Obviously, I find this bad/dangerous for street driving - or very annoyingly ASC prone.

Evo X's do two things really well: make a lot of power (even on stock turbo), and put most of said power down most of the time with it's AWC/AYC. Because of it's ability to utilize so much power mid-turn, my experience found that the rear tires undergo large amounts of load from the AWC/AYC alone. Overloading the tires too much causes RWD-like oversteer, where the tires simply spin. Loaded just right however, the Evo X seems to pull these amazing turning angles WITHOUT ANY wheel spin or loss of rear traction. At full throttle, the AYC just seems to fully understand and attempts to glide rally-style while still powering forward (provided the tire grip is there)

Take the most beautiful smoke-creating tail-slide you can imagine, and the Evo X can do the same angle without burning rubber. Take the most radical rally car, gliding across a gravel turn sideways, and the Evo X can still do that on tarmac.

I think it's a very un-recognized talent in the AWC/AYC. It's a very weird experience at first, and responding to corners with more throttle rather than tapping the brakes feels un-natural at first. But when setup correctly, the AWC/AYC system will do all the work - and god damn it works beautifully.



This balance gets harder to achieve the more power you make - something I'm tinkering with right now and I'm very OCD about. I don't like the power-sliding shenanigans that other are used to. I like to achieve oversteer without/with more rear traction, something this car has great potential doing compared to a RWD car.

Things to keep in mind when choosing/adjusting sway bars. Sort of a rant, but that's my opinion on setting up balance. Feel free to discuss :drive:

I might expand on this later
Wait a second...

Simple rules do apply here, if you stiffen up the front of an Evo X it'll push on the nose. Stiffen up the rear and you'll have the opposite. Thing is, it's not quite as simple as that either as most people are going to have:

A. Different Spring Rates - Front and Rear
B. Different Ride Heights
C. Different Bump Compression
D. Different Rebound Compression
C. Different Anti-Roll bars

ALL of those differences will make very big changes to how a car handles. Added to that, understeer on entry of a corner is different to mid corner push and exit. You'll do different things to combat understeer dependent on where the understeer is during a corner, is it at entry? Is it more prevelent mid corner and exit?

As an example, softer bump compression will help with reducing understeer on entry of the corner, where as harder bump compression will help with mid corner and exit push. So something as simple as bump compression can make a difference one way or the other dependent on WHAT part of the corner you are attacking. Everyone on here has for the most part different setups. Wether it be different allignments, tyres, suspension, ride height etc etc. So Blanket statements dont always cover everything and everyone.

When we run our Evo X Time Attack race car at an event I sit down with the driver and go through each corner around the circuit with him. I ask the driver to rate out of 10 how the cars feels around the corner, then we disect that up into each part of the corner so each part has a 10/10 rating attached to it. We do this as small changes can be made once we see a pattern developing on one particular part of multiple corners, of course this changes from track to track as each race track will have different surfaces, corners, grip levels, elevation changes. So there isn't one perfect setting to use everywhere, it simply doesnt work like that.

No I know you are talking about autocross and a D/D car but for the most part, yes an anti-roll bar on the rear as a blanket statement (which I've shown can not always be true due to many factors) will on the whole make an Evo X exhibit more understeer.

Not trying to take anything away from the thread, I reckon it's a great idea and will assist alot of people, I'm just trying to add some more content so people can think about the changes they are making and what effects they will net because of those changes. Also, what works for one car and driver, won't neccessarily work for another. From there you have driving styles and sweet jesus that is a whole other ball game.
 

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pretty much this is a reason why I haven't created a review of the JRZ RS1's I have, and/or touched this subject in any of the threads I made - I am NOT an expert; I just share what I know and my actual experiences

anyway, the number one thing to keep in mind when talking shock adjustment is what "more/less rebound" means (and compression, vice versa)

I work with pressure systems all day at work, including pistons that would be similar to a coilover shock - so my preference/tendency is to think of everything in terms of speed. It took me a few emails for [email protected] to clear this up for me. I personally think it's ass-backwards, but whatever.

the general standard is that people talk in terms of rebound FORCE (or compression, or whatever adjustment) - NOT SPEED.

Now you can talk about whatever however you want, just be sure to make it clear. Anybody who talks to me about this, I refer to what is "standard", but still elaborate what I'm aiming to adjust.

Rebound FORCE is the force of the shock AGAINST rebound.
So this means, when you "add rebound", you're slowing down rebound speed. Again, vice versa for other adjustments

Great thread and idea. I recently put installed my auto fortune 510s. I am waiting to get an alignment before I adjust, but I have been on google looking for specs, or ideas on how to tune them. From what I found is adjusting the preload (which I did prior to installing them and they were all good) and for the stiffness, maybe thats the rebound I am not sure as I am retarded when it comes to suspension but they said to set them all the way on high, and go 5 clicks when adjusting from there. Looking forward to seeing what people post!
going full "high" (which I'm guessing means full "+") would mean max rebound force. that would lead to the most uncompliant ride possible. so they're saying you're starting from worst and taking out rebound until it feels fine. I personally would say go the other way, but I guess it doesn't matter if you end up in the same spot anyway

just remember if you're googling around about my information above - the general consensus talks about adjustments in terms of force, not speed

Then I said, ahhhh, thats why they have high speed rebound and low speed rebound adjustment, I was only thinking of high speed (going over bumps) so basically with our single adjustables, we have to find the sweet spot for both high and low speed also, rebound is the force of the coilover pushing the wheel back down, and the stiffer the rebound, the slower the coilover pushes the wheel back down, right?

I thought this was great info that needs to be shared and continued to talk about.

If you have a question about your suspension, feel free to post.
Right, but obviously adjustment is still useful even after finding your "sweet-spot" because conditions and tracks can change - etc etc

If I were you, I would stop using the term stiffness. I like to think in terms of valve width. When I turn the knob in the "-" direction, I am widening the valve, allowing more fluid to pass through it. "+" is obviously the opposite. My input is going to be from the perspective of a double adjustable coilover since that is what I have.

Generally speaking, the coilover setup depends on the application. Obviously for street, you want something that compresses and rebounds with moderate valve settings relative to the spring rates.

For AutoX, I would want a suspension that is faster in assisting direction change. So compression valving is going to be on "high" to allow for quicker steering response while rebound is going to be "semi-low" allowing a somewhat faster rebound than street.

For the track, I have found "high" for compression and "semi-high" for rebound to be good for my setup. It allows for a slow compression around turns and a not so violent rebound.

Again this is all based on my 11K/13K setup on my AST 5200 inverted setup with R comps. There are so many variables, its just hard to draw a hard and fast rule about what works for any one given operating environment.
Good post - but for anyone looking to learn here, be sure you read his whole post. There are MANY variables that come into play.

don't just take "ok ___ much compression/rebound for me, got it" and run with it

first thing that comes to mind is what your sway bar is set to? Remember that sway bars drastically change the rate at which the tire is loaded
http://www.evoxforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=85874&page=4

so there is no perfect answer. what is your sway bar set to? what are your spring rates? etc etc - this affects how fast compressions/rebound happens - which changes the answer on how much compression/rebound you want on your shock adjustment

good thread idea. It is surprising how little suspension tuning/setup information is on this forum.
hey now, I've created a few :(
 

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Not to sound elitist in anyway, but having used a 2-way setup, I find a one way adjustable setup to be highly limiting unless it is purpose built for an application. When its time to rebuild, I don't even find the need for an upgrade to a 3 way to assist in low/high speed compression settings. My current setup is just so easy to work with. That said, I may upgrade to a 3 way just because race car. Only time will tell how I proceed.

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Ok so did a little bit of spirited driving today. I have each coilover set all the way to the +. Now I am noticing a lot more understeer than before. My sway bars are at the middle hole as they were before when I had D2racing coilovers. So if I understand correctly from the research that I have done, I need to turn the front to the - sign like 5 clicks and then adjust from there. Is that correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not to sound elitist in anyway, but having used a 2-way setup, I find a one way adjustable setup to be highly limiting unless it is purpose built for an application. When its time to rebuild, I don't even find the need for an upgrade to a 3 way to assist in low/high speed compression settings. My current setup is just so easy to work with. That said, I may upgrade to a 3 way just because race car. Only time will tell how I proceed.

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BUT, unless you really know what you are doing, going with a 2+ way coilover can be worse because you dont know how to set them up the best.
 

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Not to sound elitist in anyway, but having used a 2-way setup, I find a one way adjustable setup to be highly limiting unless it is purpose built for an application. When its time to rebuild, I don't even find the need for an upgrade to a 3 way to assist in low/high speed compression settings. My current setup is just so easy to work with. That said, I may upgrade to a 3 way just because race car. Only time will tell how I proceed.

Sent from AutoGuide.com App
right, but most 1-way like the RS1 are entry-level coilovers

entry level of quality coilovers that is. none of that budget ****

Ok so did a little bit of spirited driving today. I have each coilover set all the way to the +. Now I am noticing a lot more understeer than before. My sway bars are at the middle hole as they were before when I had D2racing coilovers. So if I understand correctly from the research that I have done, I need to turn the front to the - sign like 5 clicks and then adjust from there. Is that correct?
eh, I hate to rag on cheap coilovers all the time but - yes that's the right way to start, but most cheap coilovers are just cheaply made and barely any of the adjustments do anything. in my experience helping others with cheap coils (mostly BC's), it's more about finding the spot that doesn't suck
 

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right, but most 1-way like the RS1 are entry-level coilovers

entry level of quality coilovers that is. none of that budget ****



eh, I hate to rag on cheap coilovers all the time but - yes that's the right way to start, but most cheap coilovers are just cheaply made and barely any of the adjustments do anything. in my experience helping others with cheap coils (mostly BC's), it's more about finding the spot that doesn't suck
I have fortune auto 510s with track spec and all them other good upgrades. I didnt think they were cheap but to each his own.....
 

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I have fortune auto 510s with track spec and all them other good upgrades. I didnt think they were cheap but to each his own.....
sorry I skimmed too quickly, thought you said you HAD D2's :duh:

FA's I've read good/bad things about them, but I have no experience with - so I have no opinion on them.
 

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sorry I skimmed too quickly, thought you said you HAD D2's :duh:

FA's I've read good/bad things about them, but I have no experience with - so I have no opinion on them.
I just got them and still learning about them...The d2 really surprised me for how cheap they are. I dont knock them too much. My first auto x was ran with them. I had one of the fastest times out there too. So they may be cheap...but when adjusted properly they held their own.
 

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Happy cinco de mayo,

I prefaced that cause I'm trashed, so take what i say with a grain of salt. but to kickass's "not to sound elitist," just cause it's single adjustable doesn't mean it's all the same. At least I think.

I've searched extensively and there isn't much freaking info on the tech behind the dfv in the stupid freaking ohlins. Some people say due to the way the dfv functions the adjuster adjusts both low speed rebound and bump. But all the ohlins literature i've read seems to imply it's just the low speed rebound. So who the f*ck knows.

I'm still playing with it to see the differences. This thread is definitely a good idea. But goddamn does suspension have a million factors. From which coilover setup (as the changes will be different between them), to alignment setings, to use of front or rear sway bars, tire compounds, ride height, spring rates... blah blah blah. I guess hard to just make 1 simple guide.
 

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Oh and Exyia, you're the man, I read all you shit and that's why I said surprisingly few. Your's are basically the "few" i was referencing. :)

I do like how you go about learning this shit. Clearly a newb like all of us but doing your research and sharing your results, it's badass and much appreciated. I'm trying to do the same, inspired by you and a few others.
 

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^^^^You're a happy drunk, nice. You party, get all sauced up, then come home and think about suspension set ups and how much you heart Exiya.... :p

I have 2-ways and am fortunate enough to have the maker of those coilovers in close proximity to me. I just don't have the patience or the brainpower to go the myriad different factors that go into a proper set up. I just let them do it. I don't understand it, and I know I'll just make a mistake without their handholding. I guess I'm being a puss, but I see it the same way I see my tune. Its so very important and I know so little about it, I leave it to the pros.
 

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This is a great thread idea. I have a lot to learn on this matter, and damn can it be confusing. Thanks for all the contributions already. And those to come.
 

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BUT, unless you really know what you are doing, going with a 2+ way coilover can be worse because you dont know how to set them up the best.
I agree only with respect to 3+, its true. Its also one of the reasons I'm shying away from 3+. With a 2 way, its very simple. If the car isn't absorbing enough shock or is compressing too much, you turn one knob. If the rebound after going on a bump is too violent or is not felt enough, you turn the second knob. Basically, you can run a wider range of tire compounds for a given spring rate than an equivalent 1-way. In a 1-way, once you get the desired compression setting down, you are stuck with the rebound setting that comes with it.

right, but most 1-way like the RS1 are entry-level coilovers

entry level of quality coilovers that is. none of that budget ****



eh, I hate to rag on cheap coilovers all the time but - yes that's the right way to start, but most cheap coilovers are just cheaply made and barely any of the adjustments do anything. in my experience helping others with cheap coils (mostly BC's), it's more about finding the spot that doesn't suck
I guess I'm trying to say that if one is serious about racing enough number of times in a year to warrant a coilover setup, I find a 2-way setup to be more apt for such an application. On a mostly street driven vehicle with only a handful of events every year, a good quality 1-way may be all that is cost-justifiable and a good compromise.

Happy cinco de mayo,

I prefaced that cause I'm trashed, so take what i say with a grain of salt. but to kickass's "not to sound elitist," just cause it's single adjustable doesn't mean it's all the same. At least I think.

I've searched extensively and there isn't much freaking info on the tech behind the dfv in the stupid freaking Ohlins. Some people say due to the way the dfv functions the adjuster adjusts both low speed rebound and bump. But all the ohlins literature i've read seems to imply it's just the low speed rebound. So who the f*ck knows.

I'm still playing with it to see the differences. This thread is definitely a good idea. But goddamn does suspension have a million factors. From which coilover setup (as the changes will be different between them), to alignment setings, to use of front or rear sway bars, tire compounds, ride height, spring rates... blah blah blah. I guess hard to just make 1 simple guide.
Haha, happy Cinco De Mayo. Actually, Ohlins was on my list when I was in the market for a setup. I went back and forth between AST and Ohlins for quite a while. There was a severe lack of info for both setups on track-oriented Evos, let alone the Evo X. The first Google result for "Ohlins DFV" will give some basic info about the tech behind the DFV.

From my understanding, all one ways are the same in the basic concept that you get a preset list of combinations of compression and rebound settings. The only thing that seems to differ from one brand to the other is the valving type and quality.

The DFV is a really good setup because of its inherent adaptability to high-speed and low-speed rebounds. But ultimately, on any given track day, if you realize that you've nailed your compression settings for that track or tire compound you're running, but are not happy with the rebound speeds, you are basically still SOL even with a DFV setup. I know DFVs are the forum favorite and I might catch some flak for writing that, but it is the truth when it comes to any 1-way setup. I find them more suitable for DD scenarios, because I think they are more likely to meet the design goals of the DFV.

PS, I am not trying to make this a 1 way vs 2 way or Ohlins vs AST thread. On the contrary, I'm just trying to share my thoughts on the limitations of a 1-way in some applications. I have also not ridden in a Ohlins setup car, so take all that I've written for what its worth.
 

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^ nope, that makes complete sense.

And ultimately I went with the ohlins for the "road and track" performance. I knew they weren't the best track coilover, but I love the whole concept of a setup that is functional as a DD and can kick ass at the track. Not saying the ASTs don't! or JRZs.

And I don't want this at all to be a thread of which setup is better then which. More just laying the tech out there, how it functions, what to look for when making changes...
 
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